iCloud security: How (and why) to enable two-factor authentication

Given that so many of the details of our digital lives are either with us (on our smartphones) or easily accessible (via the web), you should be doing everything you can to protect that information and data. On iPhones and iPads, data is largely kept in a vault, sealed behind strong encryption and (hopefully) a strong password. Even if the device is lost or stolen, chances are good that encryption will keep data safe. (That vault is secure enough to frustrate even the FBI.)

Although iOS devices are designed and built to be secure, data is also stored and accessible online. With security breaches occurring routinely, your data is vulnerable to anyone in the world with an internet connection and a halfway decent browser. If a breach occurs and thieves gain access to your email and password, they can easily reset any account linked to that email, change the password, and lock you out of your own data.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Cloud computing reversal: From ‘go away’ to ‘I can’t miss out’

Isaac Asimov once said, “I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them.” That quote has stuck with me to this day. There’s no doubt that computers and computing have changed our lives. Without them, we would be slaves to processes and paper.

I was reminded of Asimov’s quote when I saw the results of a recent poll done by Comvault of 100 IT leaders. More than two thirds said that they were worried about keeping up to date with the latest products and iterations across the major cloud providers. In other words, they fear missing out.

About a quarter (24 percent) of those polled said they were a cloud-only organization, which perhaps means they are very small or very new businesses. Additionally, 32 percent said they are cloud-first, with plans to become cloud-only, so they are likely mid-sized businesses. Also, 6 percent said they did not have a specific migration plan, which means they are BDCs (big dumb companies).

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Kii introduces its Thing Interaction Framework to simplify and speed up Internet of Things development

Internet of Things Kii introduces its Thing Interaction Framework to simplify and speed up Internet of Things developmentKii has announced the availability of its new platform functionality, Thing Interaction Framework, which allows IoT solutions developers to simplify and speed up the development of both business/industrial and consumer-focused IoT solutions. 

An extension of the Kii Cloud, the new framework specifically focuses on common IoT use cases around sensor-cloud-app interactions (like sensor state registration/retrieval, trigger-driven command execution on devices, etc.) and significantly reduces server code that would otherwise be needed to implement them.

This enhancement incorporates a number of best practices involved in implementing interactions between the various moving parts in a typical IoT solution – like devices, services, apps, states, commands, triggers, etc. Thing (sensor/device) manufacturers and mobile app developers can adapt and customize the framework through new and updated SDKs.

“Thing Interaction Framework extends Kii’s commitment to simplify and speed up IoT solution development,” explains Phani Pandrangi, Chief Product Officer at Kii. “With this framework providing most of the server side functionality pre-packaged (yet customizable) for a variety of use cases, our customers can focus on the specifics of their solution and implement complex interactions with mostly client side coding.”

This framework also facilitates interoperability between different IoT solutions. The abstraction provided by the framework exposes clean interfaces to the state data, actions, commands and triggers of sensors/devices, thereby making creation of interoperability logic easier and more modular than ever before.

Thing Interaction Framework is available now to customers, more information at: http://documentation.kii.com/en/guides/thingifsdk/.


CloudTimes

IDG Contributor Network: Simpler applications and smarter databases, Part 2

In my last blog post, I talked about the emergence of NoSQL as an antidote to the deficiencies of traditional SQL RDBMS products, and I concluded with the question about where the data management industry is going given the current environment, and whether we’re really addressing the needs of senior technology leadership.

Let’s start with going a bit further into the trade-offs represented by NoSQL.

KISS and the cloud

The NoSQL movement is not merely a slam against the traditional RDBMS. NoSQL seeks to offer solutions, solutions that address the list of needs I outlined in my last post.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Oracle’s Hurd, AT&T’s Donovan on their massive cloud migration deal

If worries about digital transformation projects keep you up at night, imagine how it would feel to be responsible for moving thousands of internal databases to the cloud for a company with more than $ 160 billion in annual sales and 260,000 employees. That’s the job that AT&T Communications CEO John Donovan is undertaking, and he’s working with Oracle CEO Mark Hurd to do it. 

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(Insider Story)
CIO Cloud Computing