IDG Contributor Network: Challenges in realizing the promises of the holistic edge

Cloud providers such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are already rolling out distributed cloud infrastructure. Whilst the central cloud is established as an integral part of current and future networks, there are key issues that make the central cloud simply not the solution to several use cases.

  • Latency, also known as the Laws of Physics: The longer the distance is between two communicating entities, the longer the time it takes to move content there. Whilst the delay of reaching out to the cloud today might be tolerable for some applications, it will not be the case for emerging applications that will require nearly instantaneous responses (e.g. in industrial IoT control, robots, machines, autonomous cars, drones, etc.).
  • Data volume: The capacity of communication networks will simply not scale with the insane amount of raw data that is anticipated will need ferrying to and from a remote cloud center.
  • Running costs: The cost of a truly massive computational and storage load in the cloud will simply not be economically sustainable over the longer term.
  • Regulatory: There are and will very likely be new constraints (privacy, security, sovereignty, etc.) which will impose restrictions on what data may or may not be transferred and processed in the cloud.

So it certainly does make sense to distribute the cloud and interconnect this distributed infrastructure together with the central cloud. This process has already begun. One good tangible example is Amazon’s launch of the AWS GreenGrass (AWS for the Edge) product and their declared intentions to use their Whole Foods Stores (in addition to the small matter of selling groceries) as locations for future edge clouds/data centers. In general, cloud providers, perhaps driven by their real estate choices, have a relatively conservative view of the edge, restricting it to a point of presence typically 10 to 50 km from the consumer.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Must-have features for enterprise VoIP

If your company has 100+ users and is in the market for a hosted VoIP phone system, be careful.

Remember the scene in the movie Tommy Boy, “Fat Guy in a Little Coat”? You don’t want your company’s new phone system to feel like this.

You won’t hear it from the salespeople [collective gasp] but most hosted VoIP solutions are designed for micro-size companies. If you want an “enterprise” system, you will have to dig a little to find a provider catering to larger companies.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Apple embraces a multi-cloud future, and that’s exciting

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Major IT Players Form R Consortium to Strengthen Data Analysis

r consortium 300x199 Major IT Players Form R Consortium to Strengthen Data AnalysisThe Linux Foundation announced the formation of R Consortium, with the intention of strengthening technical and user communities around the R language, the open source programming language for statistical data analysis.

The new organization R Consortium became an official project of Linux Foundation and is designed to strengthen R language users.  It is expected that R Consortium will complement the existing fund, and will focus on expanding the user base of R, as well as focus on improving the interaction of users and developers.

The Representatives of the R Foundation and industry representatives are behind the new consortium. Microsoft and RStudio have joined the consortium as platinum members. TIBCO Software is a gold member and Alteryx, Google, HP, Mango Solutions, Ketchum Trading and Oracle have joined as silver members.

R Consortium will complement the work of R Foundation, establishing communication with user groups and engaging in supporting projects – related to the creation and maintenance of R mirror sites, testing, resources for quality control, the financial support and promotion of the language. Also, the consortium will assist in creating support packages for R and organizing other related software projects.

R is a programming language and development environment for scientific calculations and graphics that originated at the University of Auckland (New Zealand). The R language has enjoyed significant growth and now supports more than two million users. A wide grass industries adopted the R language, including biotech, finance, research and high-tech industries. The R language is integrated with frequency analysis, visualization, and reporting applications.

Having acquired the company Revolution Analytics (which makes strong use of language), Microsoft announced that it is joining the consortium together with other founding members such as Google, Oracle, HP, Tibcom, Rstudio, Alteryx to finance the new consortium.

Microsoft’s official said that “the R Consortium will complement the work of the R Foundation, a nonprofit organization that maintains the language, and will focus on user outreach and other projects designed to assist the R user and developer communities. This includes both technical and infrastructure projects such as building and maintaining mirrors for downloading R, testing, QA resources, financial support for the annual useR! Conference and promotion and support of worldwide user groups.”

Google also says they have thousands of users and their own developers using R, so this language is crucial for many of their products. Google is happy to join the rest of companies to continue to maintain the infrastructure of the open source R.

Microsoft’s support of real-time analytics for Apache Hadoop in Azure HDInsight and machine learning in Azure Marketplace use R language to service anomaly detection for preventive maintenance or detection of fraud.


CloudTimes

Enterprises Migrating IT Infrastructure Investments to the Cloud – IDC Report

IDC Logo square 300x300 Enterprises Migrating IT Infrastructure Investments to the Cloud – IDC ReportThe cloud infrastructure sales increased over 25% to almost $ 6.3 billion in the first quarter 2015 as the companies are undertaking more and more workload by outsourcing their IT to the cloud.

According to the analyst firm IDC, the cloud infrastructure market segment registers second highest growth. As a logical consequence, the technologies that the basis for the cloud, such as servers, storage systems and Ethernet switches, account for 30% of expenditure in 2015, against 26.4% in 2014.

The growth of Cloud IT infrastructure continues to outperform the overall market of IT infrastructure, driven by companies’ decision to move their workloads to cloud platforms. In this context, HP maintained its position as No. 1 in the world with a 15.7 % market share, followed by Dell (11.9%), Cisco (9.3%), EMC (7.2%) NetApp (4.4%) and Lenovo (3.6%).

However, it is noteworthy that this upward trend is certainly general in the world, with the exception of areas of Eastern and Central Europe, where the cloud infrastructure sales declined over the period. IDC attributes this to the unstable political and economic climate.

The report says “end users continue to evaluate various approaches to adopting cloud-based IT: some integrate public cloud service into their IT strategies, others choose to build their own private clouds or use third-party private cloud offerings, and some, seeing benefits in both, implement hybrid cloud strategies. The breadth and width of cloud offerings only continue to grow, with an increasing universe of business- and consumer-oriented solutions being born in the cloud and served better by the cloud. This growing demand from the end user side and expansion of cloud-based offerings from service providers will continue to fuel growth in spending on the underlying IT infrastructure in the foreseeable future.”

Investments are growing in both public cloud and private cloud. But it is the public cloud that carves the lion’s share with two-thirds of the cloud infrastructure expenditures dedicated to them. While sales of private cloud rose 24.4% to $ 4.2 billion, those of public cloud have evolved similarly, a 25.5% increase to $ 3.9 billion.

The report further noted that “Cloud IT infrastructure growth continues to outpace the growth of the overall IT infrastructure market, driven by the transition of workloads onto cloud-based platforms. Both private and public cloud infrastructures have been growing at a similar pace, suggesting that customers are open to a broad array of hybrid deployment scenarios as they modernize their IT for the 3rd Platform, begin to deploy next-gen software solutions, and embrace modern management processes that enable agile, flexible, and extensible cloud platforms.”

In the next five years, IDC expects spending on cloud infrastructures continue to grow, and their share of total infrastructure spending should increase to 50% as companies continue to turn increasingly to the public cloud.


CloudTimes