IDG Contributor Network: Challenges in realizing the promises of the holistic edge

Cloud providers such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are already rolling out distributed cloud infrastructure. Whilst the central cloud is established as an integral part of current and future networks, there are key issues that make the central cloud simply not the solution to several use cases.

  • Latency, also known as the Laws of Physics: The longer the distance is between two communicating entities, the longer the time it takes to move content there. Whilst the delay of reaching out to the cloud today might be tolerable for some applications, it will not be the case for emerging applications that will require nearly instantaneous responses (e.g. in industrial IoT control, robots, machines, autonomous cars, drones, etc.).
  • Data volume: The capacity of communication networks will simply not scale with the insane amount of raw data that is anticipated will need ferrying to and from a remote cloud center.
  • Running costs: The cost of a truly massive computational and storage load in the cloud will simply not be economically sustainable over the longer term.
  • Regulatory: There are and will very likely be new constraints (privacy, security, sovereignty, etc.) which will impose restrictions on what data may or may not be transferred and processed in the cloud.

So it certainly does make sense to distribute the cloud and interconnect this distributed infrastructure together with the central cloud. This process has already begun. One good tangible example is Amazon’s launch of the AWS GreenGrass (AWS for the Edge) product and their declared intentions to use their Whole Foods Stores (in addition to the small matter of selling groceries) as locations for future edge clouds/data centers. In general, cloud providers, perhaps driven by their real estate choices, have a relatively conservative view of the edge, restricting it to a point of presence typically 10 to 50 km from the consumer.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Must-have features for enterprise VoIP

If your company has 100+ users and is in the market for a hosted VoIP phone system, be careful.

Remember the scene in the movie Tommy Boy, “Fat Guy in a Little Coat”? You don’t want your company’s new phone system to feel like this.

You won’t hear it from the salespeople [collective gasp] but most hosted VoIP solutions are designed for micro-size companies. If you want an “enterprise” system, you will have to dig a little to find a provider catering to larger companies.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Challenges in realizing the promises of the holistic edge

Cloud providers such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are already rolling out distributed cloud infrastructure. Whilst the central cloud is established as an integral part of current and future networks, there are key issues that make the central cloud simply not the solution to several use cases.

  • Latency, also known as the Laws of Physics: The longer the distance is between two communicating entities, the longer the time it takes to move content there. Whilst the delay of reaching out to the cloud today might be tolerable for some applications, it will not be the case for emerging applications that will require nearly instantaneous responses (e.g. in industrial IoT control, robots, machines, autonomous cars, drones, etc.).
  • Data volume: The capacity of communication networks will simply not scale with the insane amount of raw data that is anticipated will need ferrying to and from a remote cloud center.
  • Running costs: The cost of a truly massive computational and storage load in the cloud will simply not be economically sustainable over the longer term.
  • Regulatory: There are and will very likely be new constraints (privacy, security, sovereignty, etc.) which will impose restrictions on what data may or may not be transferred and processed in the cloud.

So it certainly does make sense to distribute the cloud and interconnect this distributed infrastructure together with the central cloud. This process has already begun. One good tangible example is Amazon’s launch of the AWS GreenGrass (AWS for the Edge) product and their declared intentions to use their Whole Foods Stores (in addition to the small matter of selling groceries) as locations for future edge clouds/data centers. In general, cloud providers, perhaps driven by their real estate choices, have a relatively conservative view of the edge, restricting it to a point of presence typically 10 to 50 km from the consumer.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Lending as a service (LaaS) and why it matters

The financial crisis of 2008 caused global shockwaves, wrecking businesses and wiping away thousands of dollars’ worth of individuals’ savings. World markets are still recovering to this day, and governments have enacted strong reforms to prevent a repeat occurrence. These new, stricter regulations have deeply changed the financial world. Along with shifts in consumer preferences, banks and lenders are now faced with a vastly different financing landscape.

Traditional financial services providers have tightened their lending requirements, leading to tougher barriers for regular customers to find funding. Whereas customers with weaker credit had few problems finding loans in the past, banks are now turning them away in droves. For many small business owners, this harder path to access financing through loans means that they are left with few channels to uncover the capital they need. However, developments in financial technology and online lending offer small businesses a new alternative in the form of lending as a service, or LaaS.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Artificial intelligence and digital communication are disrupting the contact center space

The customer service (contact center) space is accelerating faster than the market has ever seen up to this point. Artificial intelligence and digital communication is changing everything.

Let’s start with some context. Right now we’re in the middle of a major market disruption by cloud-based contact center software platforms. They’re turning the conservative call center space into cutting-edge contact centers by helping them give up the expense and complexity of their hosted gear for easy-to-use, budget-friendly software as a service products in the cloud. They’re doing a great job of convincing and it’s coming at the expense of the traditional on-premise sellers at nearly 24% year over year growth (projected average over the next five years). That’s a ton of market share to lose in a very short amount of time.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Simpler applications and smarter databases, Part 2

In my last blog post, I talked about the emergence of NoSQL as an antidote to the deficiencies of traditional SQL RDBMS products, and I concluded with the question about where the data management industry is going given the current environment, and whether we’re really addressing the needs of senior technology leadership.

Let’s start with going a bit further into the trade-offs represented by NoSQL.

KISS and the cloud

The NoSQL movement is not merely a slam against the traditional RDBMS. NoSQL seeks to offer solutions, solutions that address the list of needs I outlined in my last post.

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CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: SIP trunks are more reliable than a PRI T1

Are SIP trunks as reliable as an ISDN PRI T1?

I’m asked this question a lot, so I thought it’d be a great blog topic.

I don’t think you are as concerned with this as the amber lights in the server room… But if you are making any changes to your company’s phone system, I’m assuming this question is on your mind.

The simple answer is… no. SIP trunks are not as reliable. They are more reliable than a Primary Rate Interface (PRI). But it has nothing to do with the public Internet.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: 7 reasons mid-size tech companies should reconsider going all-in on public cloud

AWS primarily and Azure, of late, dominate today’s discussions around storage, backup and compute power. A quick glance at headlines from technology journalists, and a reader can glean a common coverage theme that ties these writers together — the ongoing discussion around the benefits of going all-in on the public cloud. However, in most cases technology journalists are writing about larger corporations, or big name installations, which may or may not reflect the actual trends taking place in the marketplace, especially at mid-size companies and organizations experiencing a growth spurt.

As one who is regularly engaged with the CIOs at mid-size and smaller companies and organizations, I don’t see them going all-in on the cloud right now; rather some are pulling back from it and either opting a hybrid cloud solution, or are going all-in with on-prem backup solutions. In fact, according to a survey published by SMB analyst firm Techaisle LLS, the hybrid cloud is now being used by 32 percent of midmarket (100 to 999 employees) organizations, and that figure is expected to remain relatively flat at 31 percent into next year, in spite of what your read in the press about AWS or Azure penetration.

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: 8 steps to IT control in a self-service cloud world

The natural cycle in IT is to move from decentralized to centralized services. When networking first appeared, it was implemented at a department level for printer sharing. It was decentralized—resulting in a hodgepodge of networks and protocols. Eventually IT organizations determined that it was much more efficient to centralize this effort and we saw the adoption of large-scale, TCP/IP networks. Today nearly every IT organization has a centralized networking team that manages and deploys IP-based infrastructure.

When SaaS applications such as Salesforce first appeared, they were adopted by sales organizations. As adoption levels grew, enterprises needed centralized data integration, identity and access management, and other functions that are inefficient to deliver at departmental scale. Today Salesforce is typically managed by a centralized IT organization.

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Network World Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Red Hat expected to rake in $2.4 billion in revenue this year

The king of Linux, Red Hat, continues its growth as a leading Linux vendor that’s betting big on the cloud. Yesterday, the company announced financial results for its second quarter of fiscal year 2017 ended August 31, 2016.

The company generated $ 600 million in revenue for the quarter, a 19 percent year-over-year increase. Red Hat is often credited with creating a business model around Linux and Open Source: a subscription based service and support model.

Subscription revenue for the quarter was $ 531 million, which accounts for 89% of total revenue. It was a 20% year-over-year increase. Based on these numbers we can safely assume that Red Hat will be generating revenues around $ 2.415 billion in this fiscal year. That makes Red Hat the most successful pure open source company to date.

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