Misfit’s first smartwatch could give Android Wear a run for its money

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LAS VEGAS — Wearable maker Misfit is finally jumping into the smartwatch game.

The company, which was acquired by watchmaker Fossil in 2015, introduced its new Vapor smartwatch, which will be the company’s first wearable to have a touchscreen. 

The company, which up until now has been more focused on fashion-forward fitness trackers and “hybrid” watches, plans to release the $ 199 watch later this year.

Misift didn’t skimp on specs for the Vapor. It has has a round 1.39-inch AMOLED touchscreen display, which is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 2100 processor, and has two-day battery life. It’s also equipped with a heart rate sensor, accelerometer, gyroscope and altimeter. Read more…

More about Android Wear, Misfit, Smartwatches, Ces, and Ces 2017


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Apple’s Echo rival could make Siri the master of your home

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Amazon is sitting pretty on top of the smart home with its Alexa voice-controlled Echo devices, and Google will close in later this year with its own Home assistant device. But what about Apple?

While iOS 10’s much-needed Home app for controlling all your HomeKit-compatible smart home devices is a step in the right direction, the company may need an Echo rival of its own.

Apple is reportedly working on an Echo-like smart home device according to Bloomberg

This report corroborates a earlier one from The Information earlier this year that Apple was developing its own Echo-like product based around Siri.  Read more…

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Here’s how secret voice commands could hijack your smarthphone

Kitten videos are harmless, right? Except when they take over your phone.

Researchers have found something new to worry about on the internet. It turns out that a muffled voice hidden in an innocuous YouTube video could issue commands to a nearby smartphone without you even knowing it.

The researchers describe the threat in a research paper to be presented next month at the USENIX Security Symposium in Austin, Texas. They also demonstrate it in this video.

Voice recognition has taken off quickly on phones, thanks to services like Google Now and Apple’s Siri, but voice software can also make it easier to hack devices, warned Micah Sherr, a Georgetown University professor and one of the paper’s authors.

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