Google’s Android Based Brillo Has the Potential to Take IoT Automation to Next Level

brillo1 300x155 Google’s Android Based Brillo Has the Potential to Take IoT Automation to Next LevelWith the acquisition of Nest last year, Google has demonstrated its interest in the field of smart home. At recently concluded Google I/O annual developer conference, the group of Mountain View celebrates a further step forward, talking openly about the Internet of Things.

Born Brillo, a project to connect any device used, not only smartphones, tablets, computers and smartwatch, but also those that are part of everyday life such as home appliances, cars, surveillance systems etc.

Brillo is the ecosystem through which Google intends to play a leading role in the IoT. It is a platform derived from Android, and reduced to essentials to be performed on devices with minimum system requirements, therefore, suitable to be fitted for example in lamps for smart intelligently manage the lighting system of the house. The strength of Brillo is the ability to recognize these devices in an entirely automatic way in smartphones and tablets, as well as simplify the configuration process, making it accessible even to beginners.

It will be able to connect devices of all kinds, through the use of sensors from the extremely low power consumption, enabling them to communicate with each other and enabling users to interact with it such as centralized refrigerators, equipment for monitoring of home, lighting and much more talking to each other.

In addition to home automation, Brillo is also designed for industrial use. Thus, a plant could, for example, use it to connect its sensors and manufacturing equipment.

Google’s another project Weave will be used as the cross-platform protocol, based on JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), through which developers can put in communication between their devices and objects compatible with Brillo, thereby taking advantage of the enormous potential of synchronization of cloud platforms and Mobile application versatility.

As regards the technical specifications, it seems that the software developed by Google can run on devices with a small quantity of RAM, even if only 32 or 64 MB. It supports Wi-Fi connectivity and Bluetooth low energy, does not require particularly powerful processors to run and the Thread protocol used by equipment designed by Nest, a Google property company specializing in intelligent thermal control systems.

Google Brillo IoT is based on a kernel that is derivative of the Android system; naturally it compact the bone to be unified with devices of very small size and devices not too capable on the hardware side. Given the market share of Android and the open source nature, Brillo has the potential to reach the same level as Android. The choice of keeping popular Android mobile OS caters especially to the simplification of procedures developed by device manufacturers.

One thing is sure – one linked to the Internet of Things is a new territory, but which have already staked their eyes for all big technology industries. Microsoft recently announced the arrival of a specially developed IoT version of the Window 10 operating system. Huawei has presented an IoT platform called LiteOS weighing just 10 kB and Samsung has already launched the chip design intended specifically for this sector.

The IoT will come soon in our lives every day without making too much noise with a number of interconnected devices that will grow dramatically in the coming years, and it is obvious that all the big names are getting ready to new market requirements.


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Google’s AI is scary good at depicting what’s in your photos


Watch out IBM Watson, Google has its own kickass ‘Show and Tell’ AI and it’s getting pretty damn good at depicting what it sees in photos – and now everyone can use it. Today, the tech giant announced it’s open-sourcing its automatic image-captioning algorithm as a model in TensorFlow for everyone to use. This means anyone can now train the algorithm to recognize various objects in photos with up to 93.9 percent accuracy – a significant improvement to the 89.6 percent that the company touted when the project initially launched back in 2014. Training ‘Show and Tell’ requires feeding it hundreds of thousands of human-captioned images that the machine then uses and re-uses when…

This story continues at The Next Web


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Google’s smart speaker will be cheaper than the Amazon Echo, report says

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Amazon might be getting a little worried.

Pricing details for Google’s upcoming smart speaker, the Amazon Echo-like Google Home, may have just been leaked and they suggest that Google’s speaker will be a lot cheaper than Amazon’s.

The speaker will sell for $ 129 when it goes on sale later this year, according to a report in Android Police. Google Home, which the company first introduced at its I/O developer conference in May, is a speaker that also has Google Assistant built in. (You can preview the assistant in the company’s new messaging app, Allo.) It can also control smart home devices, complete searches and help you manage tasks like managing your grocery list. Read more…

More about Amazon Echo, Amazon, Google Home, Google, and Gadgets


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Following Google’s lead, telecoms and users can join in the fight against robocalls

robocalls

For the first time, Google joined the legal fight last week against robocalls.

It filed suit against a search engine optimization firm in California for robocalls that promised better results from its search engine. It also set up a new Web page for reporting robocall scams.

But even mighty Google can only do but so much to counter the epidemic of robocalls. Carriers can and should do more to combat them, according to Jan Volzke, vp of reputation services for identity management firm Whitepages.

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We’re at “at a point where we have no trust in a phone call,” he told me in a recent conversation.

In case you’re one of the six people in the U.S. who haven’t encountered such “extremely urgent” robocalls, here’s one Googlized version that also touts Bing and Yahoo. (Although it’s of the same ilk, it’s not clear if this robocall is from the company Google is suing.)

But things could change. In early summer, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) strengthened carriers’ hand in combatting robocalls.

In a big breakthrough this past June, the FCC gave the carriers the green light to block unwanted calls. The carriers had asked the federal agency to decide if they could legally offer call-blocking, given their common carrier status and other issues. Under common carrier, all traffic needs to be handled in the same manner.

Yes, the agency said. You, the carriers, can block calls.

The FCC also gave consumers additional latitude in how they grant consent and in their ability to block calls. They said consent could be withdrawn at any time, consent is automatically removed if a landline or cell number gets assigned to someone else, and text messages count as robocalls.

Previously, Volzke pointed out, it was difficult to undo consent once you gave it, and “now all robocallers must allow you to get out of it.”

If there is any doubt you have opted out, the FCC clarified that later in the summer — the burden is on the robocalling business to show the user has opted in or that there is an existing business relationship.

Carriers now “need to get serious” about the fight, Volzke said.

As one example of their weak response, he said that carriers offer “these services for a ridiculous $ 4.99 a month to block up to ten [robocalling phone numbers], and then you have to renew it every 30 days.”

He’s not alone in his frustration. The attorneys-general of dozens of states have written to the carriers to take care of this.

But robocalls have not been declining since the FCC’s decision in June. In fact, Volzke said, the amount of mobile spam and robocalls that Whitepages blocks monthly is up about 40 percent since then.

He pointed to several remaining structural issues, such as the fact that unwanted calls can involve multiple carriers and the solution would best be industry-wide. And right now carriers can only block calls as the result of each subscriber’s request — that is, it’s still onesies.

So robocalling — even, probably, robocalling that drops Google’s name — is not going away anytime soon.

As we await the ultimate battle, Volzke offers a few tips:

  • The number one thing that affects the robocalls you get is the amount of consent you’ve given. In most cases, your phone number is the key to granting consent. So, treat your phone number with a level of confidentiality just below that of your Social Security number. He noted with amazement that people list their primary phone number on Facebook and Craigslist, where it can be scooped by a spider.
  • “Get a second phone number” for public postings, he advised, and be careful when you give your number to people or sites you don’t know. “No one reads all the fine print,” Volzke pointed out.
  • If you’re already on robocallers’ list, he suggests getting an app to filter the calls by originating phone number — assuming we’re talking about your smartphone and not your landline. (Not coincidentally, Whitepages offers a robocall- and robotext-blocking app for Android and iOS devices.)
  • Next step up is call blocking for a specific phone number, although the bad guys may well change their number after a while.
  • If that still doesn’t help, and you’re still getting multiple robocalls, Volzke said that getting a new phone number is “sometimes the only option.” That is, until the carriers get their act in gear.

By the way, Whitepages is an identity data company, not the phone book. They are involved in robocall issues because a) phone numbers are a key identifier, and b) they recently bought robocall blocker NumberCop.

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