IBM Launches Quantum Computing Service for Cloud Users

The Quantum Experience that is quantum computing platform of IBM is available now to the general public through the cloud platform of the company to access and run experiment on it.

IBM QuantemGreatResponder.com  IBM announces the launch of IBM Quantum Experience a platform that will be delivered to any desktop and mobile device. It will drive IBM’s hard work to redefine its view in the business. The company trusts that quantum computing is the future of computing and has the possibilities to resolve certain troubles that are not possible to resolve on today’s supercomputers.

Qubits are a quantum bit, the fundamental unit of quantum computing, different from classical computing. Qubits can be zero or one or both. The chance for superposition, being both a one and a zero, means that quantum computers can execute some workloads significantly more rapidly than classical computers.

“Quantum computers are very different from today’s computers, not only in what they look like and are made of, but more importantly in what they can do. Quantum computing is becoming a reality and it will extend the computation far beyond what is imaginable with today’s computers,” said Arvind Krishna, SVP at IBM Research. “This moment represents the birth of quantum cloud computing.”

IBM is permitting concerned clients to access a 5 qubit quantum computer, it’s called IBM Quantum Experience. The real hardware is in the IBM Research Lab in New York State. IBM is given a programming interface and the capability to run trial programs on a real quantum computer. IBM has produced its own quantum chip running at 5 qubits.  It is estimated that it could take a machine running between 50 and 100 qubits to surpass the potentials of today’s fastest supercomputers.

“By giving hands-on access to IBM’s experimental quantum systems, the IBM Quantum Experience will make it easier for researchers and the scientific community to accelerate innovations in the quantum field, and help discover new applications for this technology.”

IBM’s step to present the service is attractive because it permits common people to try out infrastructure that has usually been limited to highly confined research labs. Though researchers expand more powerful quantum computers, IBM wishes to know which applications and algorithms will be significant and useful to businesses, using what’s accessible now. IBM planned an arrangement system that allows tests run in sequence. After a job is executed, the service sends out the outcome of the trial in an email.

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App to find cheaper petrol launches in Australia

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Petrol stations around Australia will have to smarten up. Launching nationally in Australia Monday, the app GasBuddy allows users to report and compare petrol prices around their location, and hopefully, find a better deal.

Available free on iOS and Android, GasBuddy has joined apps like stock-trading platform Acorn in choosing Australia as its first launch market outside north America. 

The app relies on crowdsourced data to supply price points at petrol stations around the country.  GasBuddy users are encouraged to confirm or report petrol prices on the app as they drive by service stations, earning points and potentially winning $ 100 in free fuel in a daily draw. Read more…

More about Petrol, Cars, Transport, App, and Gasbuddy


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Microsoft launches meeting app Invite for iPhone, coming soon to Android and Windows Phone

One of the meeting rooms at Communitech, a startup mecca in Waterloo, Ontario. Google also has 200 employees here.

Microsoft today launched a new standalone app for scheduling meetings called Invite. Available only for iPhone users in the U.S. and Canada for now, you can download Invite now directly from Apple’s App Store.

Here is how it works. First you suggest times that work for you, and then invite attendees to vote. You can send invites to anyone with an email address — even if they are outside your organization. The recipients select all the times they can attend from the app itself or from a browser, once votes are in, you pick the time that works best.

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The best part is that anyone invited can see what options work best for other attendees, and suggest their own times as well. The sender chooses a final date and time whenever they’re ready, hitting Send Calendar Invites to get it on everyone’s calendars.

Here is how Microsoft explains its thinking behind the app:

Invite is designed to overcome the biggest obstacle when scheduling meetings — not being able to see the calendars of attendees outside your organization. As a result, your proposed meeting can be repeatedly declined until you find a time that works.

From VentureBeat

Location, location, location — Not using geolocation to reach your mobile customers? Your competitors are. Find out what you’re missing.

Certain events and meetings can be moved if something more important comes up, but only each person knows best where they are flexible. By letting attendees pick times that work for them, even when it means moving one of their own meetings, can stop that meeting from being scheduled on a Friday evening.

Invite is mainly designed for users with Office 365 business and school accounts. That said, the app also works with any email account, including Outlook.com, Gmail, and Yahoo Mail.

The app’s launch and limitations are very similar to Microsoft’s Send, a lightweight email app that debuted in July. Like Send, Invite is starting out as iPhone-only, available only in two countries, and with the promise of “coming soon” to Android and Windows Phone.

Invite is the latest in a long line of apps to emerge from Microsoft Garage, the software giant’s lab for experimental tinkering. At this rate, Microsoft will soon have more experimental apps than “final” apps.

And that’s okay, as long as some of them are eventually released or integrated into existing products.

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