Microsoft acquires cloud-based HPC developer

Microsoft pulled off a big get with its acquisition of Cycle Computing, the developer of a suite of high-performance computing (HPC) services called CycleCloud for cloud orchestration, provisioning and data management in the cloud.

You may not know its name but Cycle Computing is actually a major player. In 2012, it helped Amazon create the first massive cloud-based supercomputer, spanning 51,000 cores. For just one hour of run time, the bill was $ 5,000.

+ Also on Network World: Azure Stack: Microsoft’s private-cloud platform and what IT pros need to know about it +

In 2013, Cycle Computing hit its biggest cloud run, creating a cluster of 156,314 cores with a theoretical peak speed of 1.21 petaflops that ran for 18 hours and spanned Amazon data centers around the world. The bill for that monstrosity was $ 33,000. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft acquires cloud-based HPC developer

Microsoft pulled off a big get with its acquisition of Cycle Computing, the developer of a suite of high-performance computing (HPC) services called CycleCloud for cloud orchestration, provisioning and data management in the cloud.

You may not know its name but Cycle Computing is actually a major player. In 2012, it helped Amazon create the first massive cloud-based supercomputer, spanning 51,000 cores. For just one hour of run time, the bill was $ 5,000.

+ Also on Network World: Azure Stack: Microsoft’s private-cloud platform and what IT pros need to know about it +

In 2013, Cycle Computing hit its biggest cloud run, creating a cluster of 156,314 cores with a theoretical peak speed of 1.21 petaflops that ran for 18 hours and spanned Amazon data centers around the world. The bill for that monstrosity was $ 33,000. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Microsoft Ignite: A Brief Look at a Big Conference

Microsoft Ignite: A Brief Look at a Big Conference

In terms of tech parties, it doesn’t really get much bigger than Microsoft Ignite.  Sure, there’s Oracle’s OpenWorld, which just drew some 60,000 attendees to San Francisco. And Salesforce’s Dreamforce, which attracted more than 150,000 to San Francisco last year, is on the way.

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