IDG Contributor Network: 7 reasons mid-size tech companies should reconsider going all-in on public cloud

AWS primarily and Azure, of late, dominate today’s discussions around storage, backup and compute power. A quick glance at headlines from technology journalists, and a reader can glean a common coverage theme that ties these writers together — the ongoing discussion around the benefits of going all-in on the public cloud. However, in most cases technology journalists are writing about larger corporations, or big name installations, which may or may not reflect the actual trends taking place in the marketplace, especially at mid-size companies and organizations experiencing a growth spurt.

As one who is regularly engaged with the CIOs at mid-size and smaller companies and organizations, I don’t see them going all-in on the cloud right now; rather some are pulling back from it and either opting a hybrid cloud solution, or are going all-in with on-prem backup solutions. In fact, according to a survey published by SMB analyst firm Techaisle LLS, the hybrid cloud is now being used by 32 percent of midmarket (100 to 999 employees) organizations, and that figure is expected to remain relatively flat at 31 percent into next year, in spite of what your read in the press about AWS or Azure penetration.

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